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Sizzlin’ Summer Calendar

Festivals and Extravals

Photo: Maryland State Arts Council, License: N/A

Maryland State Arts Council

Maryland Traditions Folklife Festival

Photo: Leslie Furlong, License: N/A

Leslie Furlong

Artscape


Hare Krishna Rathayatra Chariot Parade and Festival of India, noon-6 p.m., May 26-27, parade starts at the Maryland Science Center at 601 Light St., festival at McKeldin Square at the corner of Light and Pratt streets, festivalofindia.org, iskconbaltimore.org, free. The festival includes a chariot parade, vegetarian food, and lessons on reincarnation. No one wants to come back as an insect.

Sowebo Arts and Music Festival, noon-9 p.m., May 27, around Hollins Market in the 1000 and 1100 blocks of Hollins Street, soweboarts.org, free. Sowebo rocks, and with at least 20 different bands already scheduled, it promises to rock extra hard this year. With the usual food, craft, and art vendors, you can’t go wrong.

Charles Village Festival, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. June 2, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. June 3, Wyman Park Dell, 29th and North Charles streets, charlesvillagefestival.com, free, garden walk guide $8. Charles Village Festival is back, along with a swarm of hula hoops and street vendors. Patrons can enjoy live entertainment, crafts, beer and wine, food, and a local neighborhood garden. Gyrate on by and grab a hoop—it’s the new/old “in” thing.

Federal Hill Jazz and Blues Festival, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. June 3, South Charles Street, historicfederalhill.org, free. Hey, if you’re beat from your 9 to 5, split—and mosey on down to the Federal Hill Jazz and Blues Festival. Admission is free.

Honfest, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. June 9, noon-6 p.m. June 10, 36th Street (the Avenue) between Falls Road and Chestnut Avenue, honfest.net, free. Attack of the hair continues during this year’s Honfest. We all know the delicious foods will be there, but a little known fact to snack on: Honfest has received international attention from China to the U.K. So, show up. You could be the next international “Hon.”

Maryland Traditions Folklife Festival, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. June 16, Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., (410) 276-1651, creativealliance.org, free. They don’t call Maryland “Little America” for nothing. We have both the topography and culture to prove it. The Folklife Festival features music and culture from early American history, South Africa, and even Greece.

Baltimore Pride, parade 4 p.m. and block party 6 p.m. June 16 in Mount Vernon, pride festival 11 a.m.-6 p.m. June 17 in Druid Hill Park, (410) 837-5445, baltimorepride.org, free. As long as no one breaks an ankle in the High Heel Race, the area will be packed with pride on Charles Street. The event is being MC’d by Don Young and Shawnna Alexander. Cowboys and Leather Daddies included.

LatinoFest, noon-10 p.m. June 23, noon-9 p.m. June 24, Patterson Park, Linwood and Eastern avenues, (410) 563-3160, latinofest.org, $5. A fun-filled weekend of Hispanic culture, featuring live musical performances, costumed dancers, and traditional foods.

African American Festival, noon-10 p.m. July 7, noon-9 p.m. July 8, M&T Bank Stadium lots B and C, 1101 Russell St., africanamericanfestival.net, free. The festival is presented by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, and focuses on African-American life, music, and culture. The event is family-friendly and provides entertainment, vendors, and what we imagine is great food. Mix it up with Radio One’s Stone Soul Picnic.

Caribbean Carnival Festival, 4-9 p.m. July 13, noon-9 p.m. July 14-15, Clifton Park near Harford Road and St. Lo Drive, (410) 362-2957. The Caribbean Carnival Fest brings island traditions to the states with the popular carnival parade, live reggae and performances, colorful costumed dancers and authentic Caribbean cuisine.

Artscape, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. July 20-21, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. July 22, Mount Royal Avenue and Cathedral Street, along with the Charles Street corridor, Bolton Hill, and Station North Arts and Entertainment District, artscape.org, free. If Artscape has an onomatopoeia, it’s BOOM! Because it’s a constant explosion of art, performance, and exhibition. Nothing can stop the onslaught of the Art Car Show and Parade, Gamescape’s video game showcase, or the flood of people into Artscape’s concert area. Check the web site for details.

International Festival, noon-9 p.m., August 4-5, Poly/Western High School near Falls Road and West Cold Spring Lane, (410) 396-3141, free. The International Festival showcases the diverse cultures of Baltimore City with international performers, multicultural foods, children’s activities and an annual soccer competition.

Beyond Baltimore

Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival, 10:30 a.m.-9 p.m. May 19, 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m. May 20, Sandy Point State Park, Annapolis, (410) 257-7413, bayblues.org. $70, $45-$55 advance, children under 10 with a paying adult are free. Smooth rhythm and crying blues saturate the Chesapeake Bay, as the Blues Festival makes another run at raising money for charities, including: Johns Hopkins Cleft and Cranial Facial Children’s Camp FACE, We Care and Friends, and Camp Fantastic. Along with helping out the less fortunate, you’ll have access to food, crafts, and live music.

DelFest, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. May 24-27, Cumberland, MD, delfest.com, single day adult passes $55, 3-day adult passes $140 (includes camping). DelFest is a family-oriented, four-day Bluegrass and American Roots Music Festival celebrating its 50th year. It takes place Memorial Day weekend in Cumberland, Maryland. This year: Steve Martin. Also, The Del McCoury Band.

Art in the Park, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. June 2, the grounds of Westminster City Hall, (410) 848-7272, carrollcountyartscouncil.org. Art in the Park is a juried event which brings together artists throughout the region. It includes art demonstrations, family activities, food, and live entertainment.

Frederick Festival of the Arts, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. June 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. June 3, Carroll Creek Linear Park, Market Street, Frederick, (301) 662-4190, frederickartscouncil.org. Frederick is beautiful and only made more so by the Frederick Festival of the Arts. The event features over 105 artists from around the region, with activities and entertainment lining the waterway. Food from local restaurants and vendors.

Bowiefest, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. June 2, Allen Pond Park, 3330 Northview Drive, Bowie, (301) 809-3011, cityofbowie.org. Bowiefest is a longstanding tradition, bringing together local businesses, organizations, and the community. The festival promises crafts, goods to purchase, and delicious food—including crab cakes. Did we mention there’s a moonbounce?

St. Nicholas Greek Folk Festival, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. June 7-9, 12:30-10 p.m. June 10, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 520 S. Ponca St., (410) 633-5020, greekfolkfestival.org, free. Begin the season with traditional dancing, costumes, foods, and beautifully crafted art. Plus, tours of the beautiful St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church.

Columbia Festival of the Arts, June 15-20, venues in and around Columbia, including the Rouse Theatre and Howard Community College, (410) 715-3044, columbiafestival.com. Imagine Lord of the Rings as a one-man show. Columbia Festival of the Arts brings it, along with its dramatic LakeFest, musical performances, and film screenings. One event to rule them all.

Mountain Heritage Arts and Crafts Festival, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., June 8-10 and Sept. 28-30, Sam Michael’s Park, 1330 Job Corps Road, Shenandoah Junction, W.V., (304) 725-2055, jeffersoncountywvchamber.org/festival, $7, children 6-17 $4, children under 6 free. Pack up the wagon and head over to West Virginia for the Mountain Heritage Arts and Crafts Festival. It’s folk art at its finest, with handmade jewelry, dolls, metals, quilts, and wine.

HorseNet Horse Rescue Annual Spring Festival and Open House, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. June 9, 2588 Marston Road, New Windsor, horsenethorserescue.org, free. HorseNet Horse Rescue is a nonprofit, 100% volunteer-run organization. They’re in it for the horses, so much so that they’re willing to offer you a tour of the farm to meet, treat, and groom the horses, mules, and goats, most of which are available for adoption. There will also be food, drinks, and a silent auction for adults. Children will enjoy the moonbounce and pony rides.

Annapolis Arts and Crafts Festival, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. June 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. June 10, Navy-Marine Corps Stadium, 550 Taylor Ave., Annapolis, (410) 263-4012, annapolisartsandcraftsfestival.com, $8, ages 12-18 and 65 and up $5, under 12 free. The capitol of the Old Line State hosts it own juried arts festival with wine tastings, food, entertainment, and family activities.

Cypress Festival, 6-10 p.m. June 14-16, 6-11 p.m. June 17, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. June 18, Cypress Park, Pocomoke City, pocomoke.com, $2. Price of admissions includes rides, games, entertainment and contests, along with a fireworks display on June 16.

Celebrate Lancaster, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. June 22, Binns Park, Lancaster, Pa., (717) 291-2758, lancastercityevents.com, free. Traverse the Mason-Dixon line for a little Yankee fun. The event includes food, drinks, and fireworks.

KarmaFest, 11 a.m.-9:00 p.m., June 24, Oregon Ridge Park, 13555 Beaver Dam Road, Cockeysville, karmafest.com, $5. This KarmaFest will be just like the others, except it’s for one day only. That means all the same free love, delicious food, and holistic teachings jam-packed into one psychedelic Sunday. If sitting in church pews makes you rigid, join a drum circle for the day and tap into something primal.

Summer Faire, noon-5 p.m., June 30, Historic St. Mary’s City, (240) 895-4990, stmaryscity.org. Head to historic St. Mary’s City for some 17th-century fun. Enjoy food and drink the way your ancestors did. Follow the rules or you’ll end up in the stockades.

Kutztown Folk Festival, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., June 30-July 8, Kutztown Fairgrounds, 225 N. White Oak St., Kutztown, Pa., (888) 674-6136, kutztownfestival.com, $14, ages 55 and older $13, ages 13-17 $5, ages 12 and under free, all-week pass $24. Sixty-three consecutive years should say enough, but the Kutztown Folk Festival can also lay claim to being featured in USA Today and National Geographic. The festival features American-made quilts, hay mazes, antiques, and historical reenactments. The kids can join do-it-yourself mural paintings.

Howard County Pow-Wow American Indian Show and Festival, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. July 14, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. July 15, Howard County Fairgrounds, 1022 Fairgrounds Road, West Friendship, naotw.biz/powwow. Discover Native American heritage at the Howard County Pow-Wow, with demonstrations, Native American dancing, arts, crafts, and food.

Maryland State Fair, Aug. 24-Sept. 3, Maryland State Fairgrounds, intersection of York and Timonium roads, Timonium, marylandstatefair.com, $8, ages 62 and up $6, ages 6-11 $3, ages 5 and under free. It’s back! Details are sparse but the Maryland State Fair should provide all the wonders of previous fairs: delicious funnel cakes, rides, games, and animals. Do not combine all of those things at once, especially not the animals and rides.

Maryland Renaissance Festival, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. weekends Aug. 25-Oct. 21, 1821 Crownsville Road, Crownsville, rennfest.com. $19, seniors $16, ages 7-15 $9, two-day pass $28. The Maryland Renaissance Festival provides, well, what it always does: food, beer, fun, and bodices. There will be archery, hatchet throwing, jousting, and more. Dress appropriately.

Augustoberfest, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Aug. 25, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 26, downtown Hagerstown’s central parking lot, 23 N. Potomac St., Hagerstown, (301) 739-8577, augustoberfest.org, $5, ages 12 and under free. It’s not only about beer and frankfurters. The Augustoberfest celebrates a rich history of German culture, while supporting scholarships for exchange students, through a nonprofit foundation. Plus beer and Bavarian food.

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