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Grand Pricks

By the time CP Nation reads this letter, the last Baltimore Grand Prix (BGP) will have occurred (“Baltimore City Power Rankings,” Mobtown Beat, Aug. 28). As in, you know, past history. One can only hope.

After the BGP does a three-and-out, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will be searching the interweb to come up with her next pipe dream. Cigarette-boat races around the harbor? War of 1812 reenactments with live ammo at Fort McHenry? Howza ’bout pasta-eating contests on the streets of Little Italy?

The BGP will rightfully take its place in the annals of failed Baltimore sports teams and sporting events.

By the by, Mayor SRB can now focus on more pressing issues, such as what next chic hairstyle she will be sporting for the autumn months.

Patrick Lynch

Nottingham

King for a Day

Listening to coverage of the Martin Luther King Jr. march memorial, mainstream media simply cannot cover it (“The March on Washington at 50,” The News Hole, Aug. 28). At the time of the original march, underground newspapers gave direct support and understanding—even a paper like The Baltimore Sun had reporters who were sympathetic, could see the value of our witness, might drive us to demonstrations, and always covered them. A TV reporter in Baltimore, Pat McGrath, kept priceless video of the Catonsville Nine when the station would have turned it over to the FBI.

Commentators today are either not probing enough (why, I leave to you; hate to call them dumb) or have been told to toe the line. National Public Radio cannot cover the fact that Malcolm X called the March on Washington a sellout. No one but an Amy Goodman of Democracy Now can cover the right wing and call it out.

In Baltimore, for example, you have right-wing radio stations that are not confronted and their advertisers are not boycotted. There may be passion on the right, but the rest of the media does not do passion—it might rattle their base: that is, advertisers. The media (except, of course, for City Paper and Tom Tomorrow) is a gelded neuter, and thus ends up being a tool of the right.

When Martin O’Malley gets to give a speech at the memorial, when no one mentions endless wars, don’t you ask yourself: What is going on? Does anyone praise the only non-violent, civilly disobedient direct action around, such as Chelsea Manning or Transform Now Plowshares? They can’t even see it. Does anyone seek out the radical young blacks of today? Does anyone point out that the youth of today are asleep? Neither the truth nor the shades of gray are covered—too negative—and all should be sunny and bright in the American sky. Little Debbies, Tide takes out the spots.

King’s views were unpopular and risky at the time of the original march. The media today does not do that.

David Eberhardt

Baltimore

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