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Power Rankings

Baltimore City Power Rankings

Ray Lewis, Terps, General Assembly, Speed Cameras, and Pat McDonough.

Photo: Illustrations by Alex Fine, License: N/A

Illustrations by Alex Fine


 

1 Ray Lewis

Peerless No. 52 was all class in his goodbye to Baltimore, from the timing of his announcement—no endless off-season wondering a la Brett Favre—to his Cal-esque lap around M&T Bank Stadium after the win over the Colts. Let’s hope Ray’s last ride goes on for at least two more games, getting him to the Super Bowl in New Orleans.

2 Terps

And yet, while we’ve all been toasting the Ravens’ success, the hard-court Terps are out there ensuring sports fans have something to cheer for whenever football season ends: The women are No. 8 in national polls, and the men have quietly won 13 straight games, including a 91-71 drubbing of Virginia Tech in the ACC opener. Think we can get sophomore standout Alex Len to do the Squirrel?

3 General Assembly

As the state legislature returns for its 90-day session, it can’t help but improve on last year’s, which ended in total chaos that was only resolved after two contentious special sessions. This year, O’Malley and the Dem majority seem poised to tackle another ambitious agenda, including ending the death penalty and increasing gun restrictions. Come on, Annapolis, you’re better than Washington. Get ’er done.

4 Speed Cameras

City police chief Anthony Batts is the latest to declare his displeasure with the faulty cameras, promising “dramatic” reform of the system. Some state legislators are promising to address the problems in the current legislative session. BCPR sits by, waiting to set its stack of violations alight—which would probably generate enough heat to power the city for a week.

5 Pat McDonough

The Republican delegate announced plans to introduce a bill “to prohibit newspapers and other publications from printing personal or private information about firearm owners,” going so far as to agree he was willing to “limit the First Amendment in order to protect the Second.” Sounds like he’s found a sensible place to begin the difficult discussion of violence, safety, and the mentally ill: newspapers. God help us all.

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